Organic Farmer Grosses $100,000 Per Acre on 8 Acre Farm

Singing Frogs Farm

Imagine earning $100,000 per acre on your organic farm. Well, you don’t have to imagine. It’s possible and Paul and Elizabeth Kaiser have done just that on their small 8 acre organic farm in drought stricken Sonoma California. They use 10 times less water than traditional farms, and they produce their own compost, and run their own little CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) program. If you’re going to make a living farming, this is probably the best way to do it. It’s environmentally responsible, eco-friendly, and healthy, all the while producing a rather nice gross income for the farm.

Singing Frogs Farm
Singing Frogs Farm

On Singing Frogs Farm, a relatively minuscule, 8-acre operation in Sebastopol, California, Paul Kaiser says he is grossing more than $100,000 an acre just by harvesting vegetables. This is an astronomical sum for an urban farmer in today’s world.  Craftsmanship.net

singingfrogsfarm2
Singing Frogs Farm
singingfrogsfarm3
Singing Frogs Farm
singingfrogsfarm5
Singing Frogs Farm
singingfrogsfarm6
Singing Frogs Farm
singingfrogsfarm7
Singing Frogs Farm
singingfrogsfarm8
Singing Frogs Farm
singingfrogsfarm9
Singing Frogs Farmsingingfrogsfarmgreenhouses
Singing Frogs Farm

Singing Frogs Farm is a unique, no-till, ecologically beneficial, highly intensive vegetable farm in Sonoma County. Through our innovative systems including no-till soil management we have more than tripled the organic matter in our soil (which means more nutrient dense food for you!) – all while producing over five times the state average of crops per acre and while bringing back tremendous, healthy populations of pollinators, beneficial insects and vertebrates (our natural pest control).  Not only do we use less water to produce our vegetables because of our soil organic matter, we also use NO sprays of any kind, not even organic sprays, and our awesome crew of year-round employees (not seasonal) have job security. ~ Singing Frogs Farm

Building and managing a farm is hard work. Making a living at it is a whole other thing entirely.

This shows what’s possible even in a drought stricken state. With some ingenuity, good planning, determination and lots of hard work, one could build their own farm. Not only does this help the local community, but it supplies good wholesome healthy food to the entire surrounding area for a long time to come.

The is a perfect example of what can be accomplished, and shows the naysayers that it is in fact possible to flourish with great abundance!

***

Source: http://craftsmanship.net/drought-fighters/

2 COMMENTS

  1. This farm is intriguing to me. I would love more information/details on the process of getting the soil to this level of performance. I.E. how long have you been working the land with your composting practices? Do you have specific layering practices? Do you offer teaching labs/courses or any other resources to educate others on this process?